- The Farley Group

Rule Changes to Help Tennis Stay Relevant

Tennis Evolution: How Rule Changes May Help the Sport Remain Relevant

 

It is not at all uncommon for sports to evolve over time. Sometimes this happens to accommodate changes in technology, requests from players and owners, or a need to deliver what the public now wants from a sport. The latter reason is behind some proposed tennis rule changes announced recently.

 

The longest professional tennis match took place in 2010. John Isner and Nicholas Mahut battled it out over the course of three days before the former finally triumphed. In all, the contest lasted a staggering 11 hours and 5 minutes.

 

However, as the Wall Street Journal reported, the actual tennis playing accounted for less than two hours of that time.

With attention spans shortening and so many entertainment options available, there is concern that both current and potential viewers may not watch professional tennis as we know it. The proposed solution? Speed things up.

 

Association of Tennis Professionals President Chris Kermode feels these suggested changes are, "not only about the next generation of players, but also about the next generation of fans."

 

"We will be sure to safeguard the integrity of our product when assessing if any changes should eventually be carried forward onto regular ATP World Tour events in the future," he says.

 

Here are the proposed rule alterations:

 

Fewer Seeds

The number of seeds would drop from 32 to 16. The idea here is to make the early matches more exciting due to the higher caliber of players. Viewers would become hooked from the beginning and then keep watching right through the championship.

 

New Format

First to six game sets would drop to first to four, with a tiebreaker resolving a 3-3 deadlock. Also, a sudden death deuce point (allowing the receiver to choose their court side) would replace so-called advantage scoring. Sets would be best of five.

 

Reduced Starting Time

Once the second player steps onto the court, the match must begin in five minutes, down from the previous ten.

 

Shot Clock

Already tested at the U.S. Open qualifying and the Next Gen ATP Finals, this would ensure players adhere to the 25-second rule between serves. The clock would also time the warm-up, set breaks, and medical timeouts.

 

No Lets

A no-let rule for serving.

 

Player and Coach Communication

While communication would still be possible between players and coaches at certain points during the match, the latter could no longer step onto the court.

 

Electronic Line Calling

There would be only the chair umpire on the court. An electronic line calling system would signal unsuccessful serves and when the ball is out, replacing its human equivalent.

 

Increased Spectator Freedom

Elimination of the rule restricting spectators from coming or going during a match.

 

Kermode stated that these alterations should not alienate the current fanbase. A shorter format and faster pace may well stop people from changing channels, but that remains to be seen. If these come to pass, it will certainly be interesting to gauge player reactions, particularly veterans who made their reputations via the traditional form of play.

 

Changing demographics are also clearly a factor. As the veterans who reliably drew viewers enter retirement, executives hope to attract a younger demographic to the sport. The thinking is that a swifter game, and not just exciting personalities, is key to making that change.

The Farley Group Blog at 10:49 AM
RSS icon Facebook icon Twitter icon LinkedIn icon

Contributors

Blog Contributor Portrait
Name: The Farley Group - News
Posts: 20
Last Post: April 29, 2021
The Farley Group Blog
Name: The Farley Group Blog
Posts: 188
Last Post: January 19, 2021

Latest Posts

Show All Recent Posts

Archive

Tags

Tennis Soccer Components Multi-Sport Domes History Infomation Sports Domes Golf News Volleyball Basketball